1962 Rover P5

$16,500

The Rover P5 series, is a group of large saloon and coupéautomobiles that were produced by Rover from 1958[2] until 1973. Models were marketed under the names Rover 3 LitreRover 3.5 Litre and Rover 3½ Litre.

The P5 was a much larger car than the P4 which in some respects it replaced. 69,141 units were built.

The Mark II version of the P5 was introduced in 1962. It featured more power,129 horsepower (96 kW), from the same 3-litre engine[5] and an improved suspension, while dropping the glass wind deflectors from the top of the window openings which also, on the front doors, now featured "quarterlight" windows (Quarter glass in US English).

The Rover P5 series, is a group of large saloon and coupéautomobiles that were produced by Rover from 1958[2] until 1973. Models were marketed under the names Rover 3 LitreRover 3.5 Litre and Rover 3½ Litre.

The P5 was a much larger car than the P4 which in some respects it replaced. 69,141 units were built.

The Mark II version of the P5 was introduced in 1962. It featured more power,129 horsepower (96 kW), from the same 3-litre engine[5] and an improved suspension, while dropping the glass wind deflectors from the top of the window openings which also, on the front doors, now featured "quarterlight" windows (Quarter glass in US English).

The Rover P5 series, is a group of large saloon and coupéautomobiles that were produced by Rover from 1958[2] until 1973. Models were marketed under the names Rover 3 LitreRover 3.5 Litre and Rover 3½ Litre.

The P5 was a much larger car than the P4 which in some respects it replaced. 69,141 units were built.

The Mark II version of the P5 was introduced in 1962. It featured more power,129 horsepower (96 kW), from the same 3-litre engine[5] and an improved suspension, while dropping the glass wind deflectors from the top of the window openings which also, on the front doors, now featured "quarterlight" windows (Quarter glass in US English).

Production of the Mark II ended in 1965, by which time 5,482 coupés and 15,676 saloons had been produced.[4]

In the 1970 film The Man Who Haunted Himself Roger Moore plays character Harold Pelham who is seen driving a maroon colored P5B at speeds well in excess of 100 mph (160 km/h) before crashing in a serious accident. Later in the film a replacement car is involved in a pursuit before being forced to crash through a bridge into a river.